Planning a MotoGP Trip: Our Top 4 Destinations

Planning a MotoGP Trip: Our Top 4 Destinations

Are you thinking about planning a MotoGP trip for 2017? Perhaps going to a race has always been on your bucket list, and next year will finally be the year. Or maybe you’ve been to a few and want to expand your horizons. Either way, the MotoGP calendar is packed with some of the most exciting and exotic destinations in the world. MotoGP: a thrill like no other As the pinnacle class of world championship road racing, MotoGP promises explosive action at breathtaking speeds – MotoGP riders average more than 100 miles per hour during races. The 2016 season saw Honda’s Marc Marquez crowned MotoGP world champion for the third time, securing the title with three rounds to spare. In a season that featured more than a thousand crashes, the Spaniard won five races – more than any other rider. 2015’s champion Jorge Lorenzo finished third, with his Yamaha teammate Valentino Rossi missing out on his tenth world title to take second place. Planning a MotoGP trip for 2017 2017 will no doubt be just as exhilarating. Next year’s MotoGP calendar will take in 18 destinations spanning five continents between March and November. Seeing the action live is a thrill like no other. But with so many exciting race locations, the most difficult part of planning a MotoGP trip is choosing which round to visit. We’ve put together a list of our top four MotoGP destinations for 2017: Termas de Río Hondo – Gran Premio de la República Argentina, 9 April 2017 Termas de Río Hondo is a small spa city in Argentina’s Santiago del Estero Province. The Autódromo...
Red Flag to a Bull

Red Flag to a Bull

After a largely two-horse race in Formula 1 this season, we’re certainly witnessing an exciting climax. The final showdown between Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg will take place in Abu Dhabi this weekend. There were moments during the recent Brazilian Grand Prix in São Paulo when the endless rain stoppages and safety car appearances meant Formula 1 looked in danger of letting down the main reason for its very existence – to thrill and excite the millions of fans around the world, especially those who pay to watch from the grandstands at the circuits. Of course, driver safety is of paramount importance. But the technological improvements in these areas have advanced so much over the last 20-30 years that serious driver injuries and fatalities are, thankfully, incredibly rare. Crucially, the spins, swerves, skids and crashes are all part of the overall entertainment package that keeps F1 followers glued to their seats and TV screens. Car beauty parades and timing stats may be enough for some ardent petrolheads, but the thrills and spills of on-track incidents are what the fans crave. There have been some great drives in the rain in the past, but two wet weather masters – sadly no longer with us – stand out for me. In 1976 in Fuji, conditions were so bad that the final race of the season was almost called off. Niki Lauda, the championship leader by three points going into the race, had narrowly escaped death earlier in the season in a horrific crash at Nürburgring. Nobody was surprised when the horrendous conditions moved Lauda to voluntarily retire from the race midfield. This left...