Why the BBC Sports Personality Award is still relevant

Why the BBC Sports Personality Award is still relevant

by | Dec 21, 2015 | Blog, Summer 2015, Sporting Success Stories

Andy Murray was crowned the BBC Sports Personality of the Year for a second time on Sunday 20th December 2015. Taking over the crown from 2014’s winner Lewis Hamilton, the Scotsman was rewarded for the role he played in the historic Davis Cup win for Great Britain. It is a remarkable achievement for Murray to win the award twice in three years and it’s hard to argue with the public’s choice. However, is the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award still an important accolade, or is it just a meaningless celebrity showcase? We thought we’d chuck our oar in… Today’s sportsmen face different pressures to their predecessors Few would deny that sport in the 21st Century is a completely different phenomenon when compared to the past. Nowadays, virtually everything a sportsperson does is analysed, scrutinised and released to the mass media. News breaks across a variety of sources 24 hours a day. No act or comment can go unnoticed. Social media outlets such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram mean that our sporting idols can speak directly to the public, removing the previously imposed filters that official interviews entailed. It is commonly believed that sports stars, particularly footballers, are more badly behaved nowadays than they were 30 years ago. But is this really the case? One could argue that whilst undoubtedly the “lad culture” within English football encourages a certain level of indecent behaviour, the only reason footballers nowadays have such a bad reputation is that all their antics are recorded. Whether it’s a camera phone, the glare of the paparazzi’s lenses or the constant spotlight of social media,...
What were the highlights from the Euro 2016 draw?

What were the highlights from the Euro 2016 draw?

It’s been an autumn of ups and downs for international football. The repercussions of the FIFA bribery scandal continue to emerge, casting a long shadow over the sport’s reputation and damaging public faith in the beautiful game. However, the conclusion of the Euro 2016 qualifiers saw four home-nation sides heading to France – the largest contingent of teams from the British Isles since 1958 – and gave cause for real optimism. As last Saturday’s draw came to a close we could stop pinching ourselves, and start looking forward to the tournament – and it looks set to be an absolute cracker, too. Read on for our main highlights from the Euro 2016 draw. England vs Wales: A battle of Britain The group stage clash that has gained the most attention in the media is the Group B grudge match between England and Wales in Lens on 16th June. Wales’ meteoric rise over the last few years has been staggering. In just four years they have risen from well outside the world’s top 100 to inside the top ten earlier this year, and above England. No mean feat. The likes of Gareth Bale and Aaron Ramsey have galvanised a Welsh side that are riding a wave of confidence going into next summer’s tournament. Before the draw, Wales manager Chris Coleman stated he’d prefer to avoid England in the groups, regarding the “Battle of Britain” game as a possible “distraction” to his preparations. He reasserted this on Saturday evening, saying “We would have wanted to avoid it, but we look forward to it.” However, his view isn’t shared by either Ramsey...
Can Eddie Jones get the English chariot swinging again?

Can Eddie Jones get the English chariot swinging again?

The first overseas coach to guide England has now begun his work to repair the squad after the host nation’s embarrassing exit from the recent Rugby World Cup. His four-year deal extends to the 2019 World Cup in Japan, the country he guided to that extraordinary 34-32 upset of South Africa back in September of this year. The England job is not an easy one. Stuart Lancaster came in with all the correct credentials, yet it would be fair to say his managerial reign imploded in disastrous fashion. After the conclusion of the World Cup there were few who believed Lancaster would stay on. Indeed, the writing was on the wall for Stuart Lancaster ever since the infamous 25-28 loss at the hands of Wales, now etched in history as one of the most gut-wrenching defeats for the English national rugby side. The arrival of Eddie Jones suggests a new era, a new style of play and, for many, a new sense of optimism for the future. Jones himself has expressed his delight to be given the chance to work with the English national side. “The opportunity to take the reins in, possibly, the world’s most high profile international rugby job doesn’t come along every day and I feel fortunate to be given the opportunity,” Jones said. “I’m now looking forward to working with the RFU and the players to move beyond the disappointment England suffered at the World Cup and hope to build a new team that will reflect the level of talent that exists within the English game. I believe the future is bright for England.” Jones...