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The 2018 Ryder Cup Venue: What to Expect From the Course

The 2018 Ryder Cup Venue: What to Expect From the Course

Next year, France will play host to one of the most exciting events in the golfing calendar: the 2018 Ryder Cup venue will be Le Golf National in Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, just outside Paris. The competition is set to take place from 28th-30th September, and will mark only the second time continental Europe has hosted the Ryder Cup. Europe will be keen to get their hands back on the trophy after America’s 17-11 victory at Hazeltine, Minnesota in 2016. Europe have dominated the Ryder Cup since 2002, having won six of the last eight tournaments – so no doubt they’ll be looking to get their record back on track now they’re on home soil. But what can we expect from the 2018 Ryder Cup venue? Let’s take a look… The 2018 Ryder Cup venue: Le Golf National Le Golf National was designed by architects Hubert Chesneau and Robert von Hagge. A relatively new course, it opened for play in 1990, and has hosted the French Open every year since but two. The 2018 Ryder Cup venue will be Le Golf National’s spectacular championship course, L’Albatros. L’Albatros is notoriously difficult, and a favourite for many players. Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell said of it: “This is such a difficult course here, we may have one of the greatest Ryder Cup venues in European golf history in 2018.” The 2018 Ryder Cup venue: what’s the course like? L’Albatros is a stadium course featuring expansive, undulating fairways and links-style bunkers. It has few trees, but in typical European Ryder Cup style, plenty of water hazards to keep players on their toes. The man-made hills and undulations...
British Open 2016: Will This Be the Year of the Underdog?

British Open 2016: Will This Be the Year of the Underdog?

2016 has been quite the year of the underdog. First there was Danny Willett’s dramatic victory at the Masters, making him the first Englishman in 20 years to win the title. Then, just as we were getting over Leicester City’s spectacular Premier League win, Wales beat the world’s number 2-ranked side Belgium to reach the semi-finals of the Euros. And who predicted England’s 3-0 whitewash of the Wallabies down under? Not us, that’s for sure. So with the British Open now upon us, we can’t help wondering whether we might be in for another thrilling underdog story. The British Open returns to Troon This year’s tournament will be hosted at Royal Troon on Scotland’s rugged west coast. Founded in 1878, Troon is one of golf’s most prestigious and challenging courses. The course has a reputation for outsider victories. Eight Opens have been played here in the past and, for five of the winners, Troon has been their only Major championship. In 1989, Mark Calcavecchia birdied the 18th hole twice in one day, beating Wayne Grady and Greg Norman in a three-way playoff to win the title. In 1997, Justin Leonard went into the final round five shots back – but a sensational final round of 65 saw him end up three clear. And let’s not forget the Open’s most recent outing at Troon in 2004. In one of golf’s great upsets, Todd Hamilton got the better of four-time Major winner Ernie Els in a playoff. Will this year see another surprise winner lift the Claret Jug? Why not? Here are five underdogs looking for their 15 minutes of fame...
English Golf – Who Will Shine in the Next Five Years?

English Golf – Who Will Shine in the Next Five Years?

It’s been nearly four years since an Englishman was the world’s number one-ranked golfer – but could that wait be coming to an end? Luke Donald was the last Englishman to be world number one back in the summer of 2012. Since then, five different golfers have topped the rankings – Rory McIlroy, Tiger Woods, Adam Scott, Jordan Spieth and Jason Day. Danny Willett shot up into the world’s top ten following his historic win at the Masters this year. Could he be the next Englishman to make it to the top of the world rankings? English golf – rising stars The four main rising talents in English golf at the moment are Danny Willett, Matthew Fitzpatrick, Andy Sullivan and Chris Wood. After winning the Masters it’s no surprise Willett is highest up the world rankings at the moment – he’s just entered the top ten for the first time in his career. Matthew Fitzpatrick and Andy Sullivan have also made extremely good progress over the last few months, both entering the top 50 for the first time in their careers. Fitzpatrick only turned pro in 2014 after seeing amateur success early in his career. He won his first professional tournament – the British Masters – late last year, which was a huge milestone for the young pro. Sullivan has been pro for slightly longer than Fitzpatrick, making the step back in 2011. However, he had an unsuccessful first couple of years as a pro and it wasn’t until last year his form changed for the better. Three wins in 2015 really helped Sullivan get his career back on track, and he’s been...
Who will dominate golf for the next five years?

Who will dominate golf for the next five years?

As a thrilling year of golf draws to a close, debate has been raging in BAC HQ over who will dominate golf for the next five years. Following Tiger Woods’ third back operation in less than a year, friend and long-time understudy Rory McIlroy stated that he feared for Woods’ future ability “not just to play golf but just for everyday life and being able to do everyday things”. Woods now ranks outside the world’s top 350 golfers. A startling statistic for an athlete not yet 40, and who in the years preceding his final major win in 2008 dominated the sport in a manner few have done before – and none since. Numerous golfers have raised their hands to be Woods’ successor, including prestigious major winners Bubba Watson, Adam Scott, and England’s own Justin Rose. However, the outstanding candidate to dominate golf for the next five years had been Rory McIlroy. The young Northern Irishman, with four major wins to his name and time on his side looked a certainty to boss the game for years to come. But the last two seasons have seen the rise of fierce competition in Jordan Speith and more recently Jason Day. It looks like a three-horse race, but they aren’t the only contenders. We take a closer look at who will dominate golf for the next five years. Rory McIlroy With back-to-back major wins, McIlroy closed out 2014 in style and looked untouchable. Contrastingly, 2015 hasn’t gone quite to plan. Several injuries, including a notorious football-related ankle problem, impacted his consistency and availability – although he did once again prove himself...